Thursday, August 5, 2010

Featured Pen - Visconti Homo Sapiens

[You can click on any of the photos to enlarge for more detail]



As you know I went to the Miami Pen Show a couple of weeks ago and I came home with a few new pens, three to be exact. This is the first of those pens which will be featured on my blog.



As you can see there was obvious excitement generated by the introduction of this new pen line at the Philadelphia Pen Show in January. I had the pleasure of speaking, briefly, with Paul Erano at the Miami Show and he indicated to me how impressed he was with this pen. [In case you weren't aware of it, Paul Erano wrote the article that was featured in Stylus Magazine.]



The following is a direct excerpt from the article in Stylus Magazine, Spring 2010:

"...Visconti ink bottles are shaped so that a pen can be submersed in ink and create a vacuum even at the very end of the bottle. The idea for his novel cap lock system that opens with a 20-degree turn came to him while visiting his gun collector friend who demonstrated the operation of a Springfield bolt loading system. Titanium piston rods are expensive, but they are non-corrosive and have superior qualities inside the inky environment of a high quality pen. His patented double-reservoir power filling system holds the equivalent amount of ink as ten ink cartridges and does not leak on an airplane. True to the company's motto, "Do it better," Del Vecchio's verbal list of pen improvements went on to include a magnetic cap lock, handsome end pieces that insert easily into the cap top to personalize pens, a three-channel ink feed that improves ink flow, and the bridge-shaped pocket clip that hods the pen firmly without damaging clothing. (The prominent bridge-shaped clip is more than a coincidence. Florence, home of Visconti, is also home to the Ponte Vecchio bridge, an ancient landmark that carries with in the symbolic purpose of bringing people together."





This pen came with a fine nib which I had adjusted and ground to a fine cursive italic my Michael Masuyama of Mike-It-Work.

13 comments:

Julie said...

Nice. I did not know Paul wrote the Stylus article. Thanks for pointing that out! My understanding is this is a hefty pen:
43 grams posted
25 grams with out cap

I suspect this is a pen I'd have to see in person to appreciate more fully. That it truly is a tactile experience. It's just so... business like in the photos!

Patrick said...

Green...or should I say black...with envy! Great review.

bleubug said...

I handled one of these pens at the Raleigh show and it felt as solid as a rock. The pen spoke of high, high quality. Congratulations!

Sam said...

Congrats! I'd seen this pen online a little while ago, but hadn't got any further than the price tag. Thanks for a great review, I now understand why Visconti's charging what they're charging. One for the wish-list I reckon.

Speedmaster said...

Fantastic, I love the look of that!

phonelady said...

I love the look of this pen that is just awesome woo hoo . have fun with it .

bengkia said...

The pen is gorgeous. and a palladium nib! i am fighting a losing battle against quickly being seduced by it. How does the palladium nib compare to vintage flex nibs? I'm really curious about the nib.

Julie (Okami) said...

Begkia - this is definitely not a full flex nib - more like the springy flex found in some vintage Pelikans.

Note Booker, Esq. said...

Jealous, I am! I've been struggling over whether to get one of these (Retail =$595, I believe). I'm glad it's not a limited edition. That will allow me to struggle a little longer.

ladydandelion.net said...

:) Congrats! How does it feel in hand? I am very curious of the material. Like that matte black surface :)

Julie (Okami) said...

ladydandelion,

It is an extremely comfortable pen. Especially when you consider how large it is and how small my hand are. The material is cool, an interesting feel that I cannot quite describe, you really have to hold it to understand.

KjM said...

I tried to resist buying this pen, I really did. In the end, the unique materials and all I had read about the nib were just too seductive.

The fine nib writes more smoothly than others of my experience. The pen is a joy to feel and I, also, fail to describe it every time I try. I simply hand the pen to the person and they go "Ohhhhh".

I can see I should never go to a pen show.

Julie (Okami) said...

KjM -

I hear you - yes, pen shows are very dangerous. My latest obsession is a Nakaya, but I'm not ready to commit yet.

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